Boneyard Media


Archive for May, 2010

Borrowed Tunes: Little House on the Prairie does Gloria Lynne

Monday, May 31st, 2010

I guess a better title for this post would be David Rose does Marty Paich. Rose is the composer of the theme song for Little House on the Prairie, the long-running ’70s-’80s TV drama I remember being a steady depiction of heart-wrenching pioneer misfortune. Paich is the featured arranger of Gloria Lynne’s 1963 Gloria, Marty and Strings LP. Surely the image of the Ingalls family traveling on a hilltop to their “little house” had Rose thinking about Gloria and Marty’s “Folks Who Live on the Hill” to the extent that he nabbed and reworked that opening french horn intro – even building a whole theme song around it – as a knowing wink.

glorialynne

Gloria Lynne – “Folks Who Live on the Hill” (1963) (excerpt)

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

250px-lhmaintitle

David Rose – “Little House on the Prairie Theme” (1974) (excerpt)

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Borrowed Tunes: The one Rod first took heat for

Sunday, May 23rd, 2010

Although he never got in trouble for over-borrowing from Mott the Hoople (see previous post), Rod Stewart got busted pretty quick in 1978 for using Brazilian singer-songwriter Jorge Ben’s “Taj Mahal” refrain for his “Da Ya Think I’m Sexy” (with the songwriting credited to Rod Stewart and Carmine Appice). Tempers cooled, though, when Stewart announced that all proceeds for his disco-era smash would ultimately go to UNICEF. In 1978 Stewart would get in trouble again when his “Forever Young” irritated Bob Dylan, whose own “Forever Young” was an obvious influence. So the two mammoths ended up splitting the royalties, which was no compensation for those of us who were irritated by the song in general.

163416 414622

Jorge Ben – “Taj Mahal” (1972 version)

Jorge Ben – “Taj Mahal” (1976 version)

3662611

Rod Stewart – “Da Ya Think I’m Sexy” (1978)

Borrowed Tunes: Rod Stewart does Mott the Hoople

Saturday, May 22nd, 2010

Rod Stewart’s “Baby Jane,” a UK #1 and a US #14, lifted its central hook from Mott the Hoople’s “Wrong Side of the River.” I wonder if Mick Ralphs ever realized it or cared.

11867

Mott the Hoople – “Wrong Side of the River” (1971) (excerpt)
Written by: Mick Ralphs

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

183499

Rod Stewart – “Baby Jane” (1983) (excerpt)
Written by: Rod Stewart and Jay Davis

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Borrowed Tunes: Deep Purple does the Blues Magoos doing Ricky Nelson

Friday, May 7th, 2010

Say what you want about Deep Purple – they had solid source material.  “Black Night” hit #2 in the UK in 1970 (and #66 in the US), while the Blues Magoos’ “(We Ain’t Got) Nothin’ Yet” was a US Top 5 hit in 1966.

315194

The Blues Magoos – “(We Ain’t Got) Nothin’ Yet” (1966) (excerpt)

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

sblacknightsafr

Deep Purple – “Black Night” (1970) (excerpt)

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Update: And thanks to Brule who’s prompted a title change to this post and who’s confirmed that this riff’s roots go back at least as far as Ricky Nelson’s early sixties version of “Summertime.” We all know Ricky was top notch, but this just confirms it. And while we’re on it, James Burton’s guitar sounds to me like it also inspired Johnny Rivers’ hit version of “Memphis.”